Categories
Education

Draw and Explore

New Adult Evening Class

Next week we are launching a new adult evening class. Draw and Explore is a six week programme led by local artists. Participants will have the opportunity to learn from these professional artists while honing their skills across a variety of drawing techniques.

The first two sessions will be led by seven-time Bermuda Biennial artist Dr Edwin M.E. Smith (pictured above with his 2020 Biennial artwork Transience). Dr Smith will be exploring the possibilities of charcoal and loose mark-making.

The following two weeks will be led artist and educator Richard Sutton, who will be using hatching to build tones with charcoal pencils on newsprint. 

This will be followed by two sessions with Rachel Swinburne, a former Bermuda Biennial artist and founder of the Peaceful Art Protest. She will be focusing on key drawing fundamentals through a range of experimental continuous line, contour drawing and gesture drawing exercises.

Classes take place in the gallery on Wednesday evenings. Doors open at 5pm and class takes place between 5.30pm and 7pm. The course, which begins on October 27, is $125 per person and open to BNG members. The fee includes a glass of wine at each session.

All skill levels are invited to join. Limited to 15 spaces. Participants must supply their own materials. Please note that BNG members now receive a 10% discount at the Stationery Store.

Click here to register for the programme.

A government SafeKey will be required for attendance.

Categories
Education

New Education Classes

Registration Opens this Weekend

We are launching three new education programmes this fall. Adult classes will start at the end of this month and the after-school programme will begin in November after the mid-term break. 

Registration opens exclusively to BNG members this Saturday, one week before it opens to the public. Spaces are strictly limited so if you are not currently a member, join today to avoid disappointment. 


BNG Urban Sketch

BNG Urban Sketch is a new weekly meet up for artists to go out into the city and sketch together. On Saturdays from 11am – 1pm, participants will meet in the gallery and then visit different locations around Hamilton to sketch life.

Sessions start on Saturday, October 30.The programme is free and open to all to drop in. All you need is a sketchbook and pencil, but you can bring any supplies you would like to work with. Please note that BNG members now receive a 10% discount at the Stationery Store.

Click here to register for BNG Urban Sketch.

Please note that a government SafeKey is required for attendance. 


Draw and Explore

BNG has partnered with local artists to lead a six-week drawing class for adults. Participants will have the opportunity to learn from these professional artists while honing their skills across a variety of drawing techniques.

Classes take place in the gallery on Wednesday evenings, from 5pm to 7pm, starting on Wednesday, October 27. The course is $125 per person and open to BNG members. The fee includes a glass of wine at each session. All skill levels are invited to join. Limited to 15 spaces

Participants must supply their own materials. Please note that BNG members now receive a 10% discount at the Stationery Store.

Click here to register for Draw and Explore.

Please note that a government SafeKey will be required for attendance.


After School: Drawing for Animation

Starting in November, BNG will offer a six-week after-school intensive programme for high school students aged 14-18. Students will learn to create their own short animations on the iPad from a foundation of the principles of animation and drawing techniques for animation.

Classes will meet every Monday and Thursday from 3:45pm – 5:15pm in the BNG Washington Mall satellite workspace. iPads will be provided for student use.

The course starts on Monday, November 1. The cost is $250 per student and open to BNG Family Members. Limited to 10 places.

Click here to register for After School: Drawing for Animation.

Please note that BNG will supply lateral flow tests to be used before class. 


For further information about any of these classes please email Education Officer Rehana Packwood at education@bng.bm or call 295 9428.

Categories
Education

Meet our Summer Students

BNG Internship Programme

The past few months have been busy behind the scenes at the gallery and we would like to extend a big thank you to our three summer students who have helped our small but dedicated team navigate several large projects. Eanajah Armstrong, Katherine Grainge and Gabrielle-Hadassah Reid recently wrapped up a 10 week placement with the Bermuda National Gallery.

Eanajah and Katie joined us as part of the BNG Internship Programme, generously sponsored by Zurich Bermuda (a member of the Zurich Insurance Group), while Gabby joined us as part of the Ministry of Labour’s Department of Workforce Development summer employment programme.

The BNG Internship Programme provides paid opportunities for young people within the arts and culture sector and on-the-job training in all aspects of museum operations.

We sat down with Eanajah, Katie and Gabby, who each assisted different team members on a variety of projects, to find out what they have been working on, the most interesting part of their internship and what surprised them most about working at the Bermuda National Gallery.


Eanajah Armstrong

A graduate of the Berkeley Institute, Eanajah Armstrong recently completed a two-year Liberal Arts Programme at the Bermuda College. Having previously worked as a Camp Counselor at Allen Temple and as a student volunteer in Delhi, India, as part of the Bermuda Overseas Missions, Eanajah will be returning to Bermuda College at the end of the month to further her studies with a focus psychology. She plans to work in art therapy when she graduates.

Eanajah works on the installation of In Dark Seas: Swimming With Sea Butterflies in the BNG Project Space

BNG: What have you been working on during the internship?

EA: One time I was going through my emails when I came across the Bermuda National Gallery newsletter. Honestly, it was my first time receiving the newsletter since I had recently joined. I remember reading this ad notifying the public about a possible internship opening. In the next minute, I was sending an email requiring the information for the position. Little did I know that in a few months I would be selected for the programme.

When I applied for the internship I had no clue what I was getting into, but it has proved to be one of the best decisions I have ever made, to say the least. During my three months here, I have been engaged in various projects including exhibition installations, stocking and reorganizing storage spaces, researching information and other errands. Overall, I have really enjoyed being able to assist with creating a functional and spacious environment for the staff at BNG.

BNG: What does a typical day at the gallery look like for you?

EA: Running a museum is not an easy job, there is so much that goes on behind the scenes that many people do not know about. Many see the art on the wall but forget to acknowledge the ones that put it there. I am glad that I was able to be a part of a team that works seamlessly together and also does so much for the community. 

In addition, I was able to lend a hand with the Art & Tech Camp that was hosted by BNG this summer. In this camp, kids were not only able to learn a new skill but were also able to create works of art that they could call their own. 

BNG: What has been the most interesting part of your internship and why?

EA: Have you ever sat alone with art? It’s a different kind of peace, a peace that I was able to experience every day at the gallery. As you can probably guess, my favorite part of working at the gallery is the art. Unlike social media, you can’t choose what type of art you are exposed to. Being able to engage with and admire art pieces that I wouldn’t normally look at was amazing. As an artist, being surrounded by so much art has given me the inspiration to chase my dreams and hope that one day I may see my own work on a museum wall. 

BNG: What has surprised you most about working at BNG?

EA: The museum’s office doesn’t have walls, it has books. People should not be looking for information on the internet but museums instead.  If humans could swim in knowledge, the average person would drown in the knowledge that Bermuda National Gallery holds. 

BNG: Has your internship been helpful?

EA: I was asked if I would recommend this internship to someone else and the answer is yes, of course. If your passion is art, this is the place for you. If you love books and information, this is the place for you. If you love new experiences, this is the place for you. Every day is an adventure here; you don’t know what you will find or who you will meet, but what I can tell you is that you won’t regret it. 


Katherine Grainge

Katherine Grainge is currently studying Art History at the University of St Andrews, having been awarded a four-year scholarship by the Bermuda Ministry of Education. The BHS graduate, who previously worked at BUEI as a Camp Assistant and has volunteered at the Bermuda National Trust for several years, hopes to return to Bermuda to work in the heritage sector when she graduates.

Katie assists with research for The Bermuda Biennial: A Retrospective, A Selection from the BNG Collection which opens in the Watlington Room in October.

BNG: What have you been working on during the internship?

CG: Some of my work has involved helping to prepare for BNG’s new exhibitions, The Shadow Land: Cape Dorset Prints from the Bacardi Collection and In Dark Seas: Swimming with Sea Butterflies. This has entailed tasks like setting up potential layouts for the gallery spaces, photographing the artworks, and finalizing the exhibition text. It has also been very exciting to help add the finishing touches in the exhibition installations, such as putting up wall labels and setting out catalogues.

I’ve also been researching content for BNG’s future educational materials, including profiles and information on the artistic styles of prominent Bermudian artists. I’ve helped form prospective ideas for teaching activities that focus on the work of these artists.

Another research project has involved exploring the history of the Bermuda Biennials, starting from the first exhibition in 1994. It has been really interesting to look into the gallery’s archived material to find elusive information on the early biennials. I’ve found that many artists whose work was shown in recent exhibitions have actually been participating from the very beginning, exhibiting their wonderfully innovative art in numerous Biennials.

BNG: What does a typical day at the gallery look like for you?

CG: In the morning, I usually start by re-stocking the supply of catalogues for an exhibition if there aren’t enough, and then carrying out any administrative tasks that need to be done. I’ll then continue working on a research project, which will often involve digitizing physical files on previous BNG exhibitions or artists whose work has been shown at the gallery. Later in the day I’ll help with preparing the gallery space for an exhibition, which might involve measuring the dimensions of the artwork that will be displayed as well as photographing the pieces to document their condition before the exhibition. I might then assist in preparing for the installation of the artwork, which involves measuring out the dimensions of the pieces on the wall and marking the points where the frames will be hung. This is always at least a two-person job, especially if you’re measuring the width of an entire wall.

BNG: What has been the most interesting part of your internship?

CG: Working ‘behind the scenes’ at the gallery has allowed me to observe the process of exhibition planning, which has been extremely interesting. I was previously unfamiliar with the techniques that gallery curators use, but during the internship, I’ve learned about how you can curate an exhibition by developing an evolving pathway of themes, with groups of artworks that centre on different ideas. I now have a good grasp of how curators decide which artworks should be paired or grouped in an exhibition space – for example by making sure the styles or perhaps the media of the art are aligned.

BNG: What has surprised you most about working at BNG?

CG: I was surprised that I gained equal knowledge of – and exposure to – both historical and contemporary Bermudian art. Past and present artists and artistic movements were very closely associated in the projects I was working on. For example, some of my research on the biennials involved looking into the jurors of the 1994 Biennial, one of whom was the late local philanthropist Geoffrey Elliott. He was evidently closely involved with contemporary art, but my research into his work was also directed at early Bermudian portraiture, as he and his wife Fay donated two valuable 18th century portraits to BNG. I find these associations really fascinating.

BNG: Has your internship been helpful? In what ways?

CG: My internship has been immensely helpful and valuable. I’m now confident working in an art institution and I’ve gained numerous skills in various branches of the gallery’s operation, such as research, installation and administration. The internship has also given me the opportunity to observe the different roles of the gallery’s staff members and gain knowledge of approaches to curation, programming and educational engagement. My career plan is to work in an art gallery or museum and I’m sure I would feel very capable working for an institution like BNG in the future. 

BNG: What are you going to do next?

CG: In September I’ll be starting the second year of my Art History degree at the University of St Andrews. I hope to relate the knowledge I’ve gained this summer of historical and contemporary Bermudian art to the research I’ll be doing for my course.  I also intend to do some volunteer work for a museum in St Andrews, so that I can continue to gain work experience in the extremely fascinating heritage sector.

BNG: Would you recommend the internship to anyone else?

CG: I would definitely recommend the internship to others interested in the arts or cultural sector, because you’re able to undertake a really critical role in the realization of all the gallery’s exhibitions and other projects. Being so involved in gallery operations means you learn in great detail about little-known practices, as well as the essential mindsets and approaches that you should have when working in an art institution.


Gabrielle-Hadassah Reid

Gabrielle-Hadassah Reid assisted Education Officer Rehana Packwood with the day to day running of the BNG Art + Tech Summer Camp Programme. The Bermuda College student, who joined BNG as part of the Ministry of Labour’s Department of Workforce Development summer employment programme, graduated from Somersfield where she was the first Bermudian chosen to attend the At The Well Conference at Princeton University. Gabby will be returning to Bermuda College in September to complete her Associates in Arts and Science and then plans to continue her education overseas.

Gabby at work in the Art + Tech Summer Camp programme which teaches students, age 11 to 14, a variety of digital art making techniques.

BNG: What have you been working on during the internship?

GR: During my internship I have been assisting with the Art + Tech Summer Camp!

BNG: What does a typical day at the gallery look like for you?

GR: Funnily enough, a typical day in the gallery doesn’t take place in the gallery at all! We are usually over at our satellite station in Washington Mall, teaching kids about the foundations of animation, digital art or photo editing. The day is full of exercises and projects for the kids to do, and we assist them with any questions they might have. We also make sure to take some breaks to allow them to have some fun. Some of our learning also takes place outside, when we have them take pictures for projects and to give them some inspiration.

BNG: What has been the most interesting part of your internship?

GR: I think that the most interesting part of my internship would definitely be working hands on with the kids and co-creating art with them! I love to sit down, grab an iPad and follow along and do the projects with them. It’s so much fun and has helped rekindle my love for art, too.

BNG: What has surprised you most about working at BNG?

GR: I think something that really surprised me was how welcoming the staff was and how easy it was for me to get situated. I think this was because they helped answer any questions I had and were just very supportive. I’m also surprised about how small the team is, and that really makes me appreciate the work they do to make sure that Bermuda’s art is seen and appreciated.

Something that also surprised me was the talent that these kids have! It’s amazing to see the works that they can produce when they are given the right tools and encouragement! I really hope that many of them continue to foster their love for art. I would be interested to see where it takes them.

BNG: Has your internship been helpful?

GR: This internship has been helpful in terms of learning how to work with kids and effectively use my communication skills! The internship has also been good at helping me learn how to think on my feet and improve my teamwork skills. I was always in constant communication with my fellow interns and helpers, I learned from them as well and we helped each other out.

BNG: What are you going to do next?

GR: Currently I am going to finish my degree at Bermuda College, which is currently in psychology. After that I will continue my education overseas. I am excited for the journey and where it takes me!

BNG: Would you recommend the internship to anyone else?

GR: I would, because I feel like it’s a great environment filled with welcoming and warm people, who are passionate about their love for art. Even if you aren’t an artist yourself, there is still a place for you, and you’ll have the support you need to hit the ground running.

I would like to thank BNG again for this opportunity to work with them! I had such a wonderful time and I would do it again in a heartbeat.


For further information, and to apply for the BNG Internship Programme, please email Executive Director Peter Lapsley at director@bng.bm

Categories
Education

Digital Art Zone

Art & Tech Summer Camp

Amongst the shopfronts that line the upper level of the Washington Mall in Hamilton, the BNG Digital Art Zone stands out like a beacon. The pop-up satellite education space, which is generously supported by Washington Properties, is home to the 2021 Art & Tech summer camp programme.

Inside, students aged 11 to 14 have been experimenting with a range of digital art-making techniques under the direction of Education Officer Rehana Packwood. Armed with an iPad and Apple Pencil, they are exploring the endless possibilities that digital art offers – from photobashing to animation and digital painting.

Digital photograph by Jordan Talbot, age 12.
Digital painting by Kaelyn Burrows, age 14.
Digital portrait of Qeir Yparraguire created by Joanna Anderson, age 11.
Digital illustration by William Britten, age 11.

The summer camp programme is currently full, with a waitlist, but these modules and more will be explored in an after-school programme in the fall. For further information please contact Education Officer Rehana Packwood at education@bng.bm

Categories
Education

Education Materials

I Am Because You Are

In I Am Because You Are Gherdai Hassell creates a deliberate, living relationship with historic materials, fusing past, present and future in a celebration of resilience.

In so doing, she gives a voice back to those who were silenced, reminding us that “Black people as the descendants of the slave trade exist more as a human accomplishment than the remains of human destruction.”

To accompany the exhibition, we have produced a free activity booklet for children age 10-14, which allows them to learn about Bermuda’s shared history in a way that they have never seen it before. 

Click here to download the education materials. 

I Am Because You Are by Gherdai Hassell

Photograph by Brandon Morrison for Burnt House Productions.

Categories
Education

New Education Officer

Rehana Packwood

Rehana Packwood recently joined the BNG team as our new Education Officer. Rehana recently returned home to Bermuda from London, where she was completing a Masters in Cultural and Creative Industries at Kings College.

Having spent several years teaching in both England and Japan, Rehana brings a fresh perspective to our arts education programming. Passionate about digital art, her first point of call is the Art & Tech Summer Camp, which returns in July and August with a focus on digital art making techniques for students age 11 to 14.

We sat down with Rehana to discuss her vision for BNG’s education programmes, the importance of art education and how art teaches us to challenge preconceptions and push boundaries.

Rehana Packwood has joined BNG as Education Officer.

BNG: Welcome to the BNG team! How have you found the first few weeks?

RP: Since I’ve been outside of Bermuda for a while, I’m enjoying the transition back. I was in London for most of the pandemic and after months on lockdown, it’s great to be back. Although unfortunately Bermuda went into lockdown a week after I joined the team so I haven’t spent much time in the gallery! I’m really enjoying being part of the team. I’m very excited for everything we have planned.

BNG: You have travelled extensively since leaving school – studying in the USA and the UK as well as spending two years teaching in Japan. What do you hope to bring back to Bermuda?

RP: I hope to be able to create a space for local kids and adults to be introduced to art programmes that haven’t been commonly available on island – from digital art fundamentals, animation, photo editing and collage to digital painting.

I hope to expand our educational programming to reach new groups. I am keen to introduce adult art programmes and after school programmes for older teens to help with portfolio development.

Rehana’s background is in animation.

BNG: The Art & Tech summer camp programme will this year focus purely on digital art. Can you please tell us more about this?

RP: As my background is in digital art, I’m very excited about the plans we have for digital art programmes. A lot of professional artists work digitally and introducing students to the different types of art that technology opens up is something I’m passionate about.

We also plan to establish a series of after school programmes in the fall to continue teaching students about digital artwork and allow them to deepen their skills.

BNG: Do you make a lot of digital art yourself?

RP: My background is in animation and I really enjoy 3D modelling. Most often, though, I spend a lot of time digital painting. I love portraits in particular.

Rehana enjoys making digital drawings.

BNG: Why is art education so important?

RP: Art represents the way we interact with the world. History is often made and preserved through art. We learn about our past and depict our present through art. We learn to challenge preconceptions and push boundaries. We create and share culture through art. That is why art and art education are so important.

Click here to register for the Art & Tech Summer Camp.

Categories
Education

Art & Tech Summer Camp

Registration Now Open

Registration for the BNG Art & Tech Summer Camp is now open. The programme, which will run in July and August, will focus on digital art making techniques for students age 11 to 14 under the direction of our new Education Officer Rehana Packwood.

The camp will take 10 students per week who will be based between the gallery and a pop-up BNG Education Satellite Space in the nearby Washington Mall. Each student will be assigned an iPad and Apple Pencil to work with.

To ensure that as many students as possible have access to the course, registration is limited to one week per student. Students can choose from a variety of modules, which will be explored further in a digital art after school programme starting in September.

The cost of the camp is $250, and a BNG Family Membership is required. Bursaries are available for public school students; please email Rehana Packwood at education@bng.bm for details. 

The programme will focus on a variety of digital art making techniques.

Digital Art Fundamentals (July 5-9): This week will teach students how to use effects in digital art programmes to create 2D graphics and introduce digital illustration techniques.

Photo Editing & Collage (July 12-16, August 9-13): Using photography and photo editing techniques, this week will introduce students to digital collage and photobashing.

Animation (July 19-23, August 2-6 and 16-20): Students will learn the principles of animation and apply those to making short 2D animations.

Digital Painting: Landscapes (August 23-27): Inspired by BNG’s current exhibition Illusion & Abstraction: Capturing the Landscape, students will learn colour theory and perspective as well as digital painting techniques in order to create landscape paintings of their own.

Click here to register for the Art & Tech Summer camp.

Categories
Education

Sumer Camp Registration

Priority Booking for Members

The BNG Art & Tech Summer Camp returns in July and August with a focus on digital art making techniques under the direction of our new Education Officer Rehana Packwood.

Rehana recently returned from London to take up the role, where is she is completing an MA in Cultural and Creative Industries at King’s College, having spent several years teaching in both England and Japan.

The Art & Tech summer camp will be limited to 10 students per week, aged 11 to 14. Members will be given priority access for registration, which will open to them on April 14, and to the general public one week later. Click here to renew your membership today to ensure that you don’t miss out.

This year, the summer camp will be based between the gallery and a pop up BNG Education Satellite Space in the nearby Washington Mall. The focus will be purely on digital art making and each student will be loaned an I-pad and Apple pencil to work with.

To ensure that as many students as possible have access to the course, registration is limited to one week per student. They can choose from a variety of modules, which will be explored further in a digital art after school programme starting in September.

The cost of the camp is $250. You must be a BNG Family Member to register, membership includes unlimited free gallery access for up to 4 family members, invitations to exhibition previews and exclusive events plus priority access to all BNG education programmes, including the after school programmes launching later this year.